Wooden Block for Textile Printing – Care and Storage


Are you one of those DIY lovers who just love creating impressions on fabrics, paper, or any other surface using wooden stamps? We have got a step by step process for you to keep them safe. This post covers:

1. Composition of wooden blocks

2. Making

3. Post printing care

Wooden blocks after fabric printing

Wooden blocks after fabric printing

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Click here to read more.

Image credits / copyright: DesiCrafts™

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Behind the Scene: Indigo Shibori in Making


Latest from DesiCrafts workshop – Indigo shibori hand dyed fabrics were made. Planning to use them and many others for making new pillow covers for our pillow section.

Hand dyed Indigo Shibori by DesiCrafts

Hand dyed Indigo Shibori by DesiCrafts

Very soon you will witness pillow covers made of these beautiful hand dyed fabric pieces.

Hand dyed Indigo Shibori by DesiCrafts

Hand dyed Indigo Shibori by DesiCrafts – Assorted set of Indigo dyed fabris

Hand dyed Indigo Shibori by DesiCrafts - Assorted set of Indigo dyed fabris

Hand dyed Indigo Shibori by DesiCrafts – Assorted set of Indigo dyed fabris

Phulkari – A Rich Heritage of Punjab


Ih phulkari meri maan ne kadhi, iss noo ghut ghut japhiyan paawan
(“My dear mother has embroidered this phulkari with her hands, I embrace it again and again with affection) These are lines from a traditional Punjabi song in which a woman is admiring her Phulkari dupatta. The woman had to to leave her parent’s house after getting married, and now she remembers her mother who has embroidered this dupatta for her wedding day.

We were in Punjab recently and have collected some Phulkari treasure made by rural women of Punjab.

The fabric that we’ve featured here are hand embroidered by ladies in Punjab. The embroidery on these fabrics is known as ‘Phulkari’ or ‘Phoolkari’ (dev nagri फुलकारी ) which means the art of making flowers.

Although, Phulkari is done over a thick cotton fabric, we have used pure silk fabrics for these sample pieces.  Keep visiting to know more about this art and while we write another blog post on Phulkari, please enjoy a wikipedia article about this art here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phulkari

Yarn Bombing Around the World


Liked this post so much that we are forced to copy and paste it as it is.  The original post appeared here: http://www.artfire.com/nosh/yarn-bombing/

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Learn how to yarn bomb!

Knit & Crochet public art

Everything you need to get started, including tutorials and supplies!

This entry is brought to you thanks to the wonderful Lisa Roden.

First, you need the inspiration.  Find some awesome pictures of yarn bombing all around the country in this fabulous Pinterest board.  Just click on the image.

Learn a plethora of yarn bombing ideas and stitch patterns from this fabulous Pinterest board!

Learn a plethora of yarn bombing ideas and stitch patterns from this fabulous Pinterest board!

“How do I even choose what I want to yarn bomb?” you may be asking yourself, well click on the image below for some great tips & tutorials.

Learn important tips and tricks about yarn bombing from this tutorial.

Learn important tips and tricks about yarn bombing from this tutorial.

Perhaps you’d like to do some light reading about the subject before you go out and “bomb” the streets, well there’s something for you too.

Read about yarn bombing from the pros who do it on the daily. Patterns included!

Read about yarn bombing from the pros who do it on the daily. Patterns included!

Learn more about Yarn Bombing from this video interview of Ishknits – the Philly Bomber!

Ishknits about to Yarn Bomb an out-of-order public phone.

Ishknits about to Yarn Bomb an out-of-order public phone.

Now that you know all about yarn bombing it’s time for you to get started.  Lucky for you, ArtFire has a great variety of instructional books & materials for incredibly low prices. Check some of them out below,  just click on the images.

Vegetable Dyes and Colors – Manufacturing Process and Use


In today’s world where we are struggling with issues like environmental pollution, fear of chemical hazards, threatening effects of global warming vegetable dyes and colors are gaining their popularity for they are pure and organic and they have absolutely no side effects on us or the environment.
Many people wonder why vegetable dyed fabrics and other items are more beautiful, popular and costlier than the regular products available in the market today.  The reason is that it takes long time and great effort to prepare vegetable dyes. All vegetable colors are made using minerals, leaves, flowers and bark of various trees. Most common among them are:
Red 
a solution of alum and tamarind seed powder is used to make red or rust color. Tamarind seed powder is boiled till it mixes well with the water and then it is left in the fiber or plastic vessles to cool down and come back to the normal temperature. The solution is then filtered using fine weave mulmul cloth (muslin) to avoide any particles and dust that may leave the color unusable. Less viscous solution is made to obtain deep red color while using the solution with high viscosity will give Rust color on the motif. If the printer has to make a very fine printing, he would prefer a rather thick solution as thin solution tend to drip and it may spoil the whole motif. Alum works as the color fixer for the solution.
Black

Iron ore is used to make the black dye. The ore is powdered and boiled to make a solution. Process of cooling and filtering is involved while making all vegetable dyes. When the dye is ready, it is directly  applied onto the pattern using a pen or a wooden block.

Violet 

Natural Indigo crystals are powdered and boiled to make a solution. The outcome of the color totally depends on the amount of the Indigo use while making the solution. It also depends on the viscocity of the solution. If one is making mauve color, one should use Indigo in lesser amount. ProfessionalDye makers weigh their contents before making the dye. It helps them obtaining exactly same color as they used for printing last time.

Yellow  
Turmeric and Harad is used to make Yellow, Mustard, Lemon Yellow and other tints and shades of Yellow. In olden days, safron was used to make yellow and Orange colors, now a days due to limited availability and high price, dyers prefer turmeric over the safron.
Orange / Red  

Flower from the tree of Palash (scientific name Butea monosperma) is used to make vegetable dye color. In India, Palash flower is also used for making colors for playing Holi (a festival in north India).

The Process
Obtaining colors from flowers is a long and tiring process. It takes from days to weeks to prepare good color in significant amount. To make dyes from flowers, the flowers are picked and petals are separated from rest of the flower, now the petals are left in hot (read warm) water(not boiling).
Flower petals are soaked in a bucket full of water before making color

Flower petals are soaked in a bucket full of water before making color

The petals then start releasing the color and you can say so when you see the color of the water in the bucket changing.This is the right time to take the petals out for grinding.

Selective collection of flower petals for making vegetable color

Selective collection of flower petals for making vegetable color

Wet petals are finely ground and left in the shade for drying. This ground paste is not kept directly under the sun as harsh sun can take away the color of the paste leaving the useless, colorless chips of the dried paste behind.When the paste is dried, another round grinding is required.

The wet petals are then crushed finely and dried under shade before following another round of grinding

The wet petals are then crushed finely and dried under shade before following another round of grinding

The powder is then filtered using a fine muslin cloth. It gives the finest powder color. Rest of the powder which still has big and small pieces in it, is grounded until it turns into fine powder. Now the powder color is ready, it is used as a solution with alum for printing fabrics, as and when required.

Vegetable Colors Holi

Kids in an Indian NGO “KarmMarg” are preparing vegetable colors for playing Holi

Which flower is used to obtain what color – 

– Red Rose for Red, Pink Fuchsia and magenta
– Palaash for Red, Orange, Yellow
– Hibiscus for Red, Rust
– Bark of Hibiscus tree for Brown, Beige and Rust
– Lavender and Indigo for Blue, Mauve, Purple and Indigo
…and many other colors are made using different combinations!
Image credits – Delhi based NGO KarmMarg

Spring green pillow cover – Made of Organic Cotton Fabric


Can’t wait to share this lovely pillow cover. This is made using Ghada fabric ( a type of unbleached, organic cotton fabric in thick texture) This fabric is widely used in making Kalamkari prints and we decided to make some block print pillows using this for a simple reason – the fabric looks awesome and it is organic. If you remember an old post about Fabric Block Printing on DesiCrafts blog, you will find this motif very familiar 🙂

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